A Weekend with Clyde Butcher, Part III: Filming for a Kickstarter and a Harmonica/Guitar Duo

By Nic Stoltzfus

Sunday, March 1st

The Sunday of Presidents’ Day weekend, we began the day by filming the intro to the Kickstarter short video. Brief interlude: What is Kickstarter? And what does it have to do with Clyde?

The reason we had traveled to south Florida in the first place was to start filming video for a documentary on Clyde Butcher. For all of my dad’s previous projects he has had corporate sponsors but, this time around, he wanted to try a new model. Clyde has a large fan base that really believe in him and what he does. Maybe there is way to include his fans in making the film? Turns out this is exactly what Kickstarter is for–gather a large group of people together to fund a project. In this case, it is a documentary on the life of Clyde Butcher. We are starting our campaign on March 3rd (just 2 days away!), and this is the first time our company has tried this model. I, for one, am really excited about this because our team not only gets bigger but exponentially so. We become one large group of people working together to form something larger than ourselves. I must confess that to work on this sort of project with a large team has been a dream of mine since I was a kid. I didn’t dream of being a cowboy or a cop. I dreamed of working for Pixar or Nintendo and sitting down at a table and creating a movie or a video game that people would enjoy, remember, and take with them. So, yes, I the idea of a Kickstarter is exciting to me. I want it to work, and I want to write a documentary on Clyde that people will enjoy. (And here is my shameless plug: we really do need your help to make it happen. If you want to support this check back here on Tuesday evening at 8:30 PM EST–we will have the link for the Kickstarter posted and it will be live from March 3rd-31st. Thank you! Now you can go back to enjoying the article.)

Anyway, back to the swamp: The opening shot for the Kickstarter video is my dad standing knee-deep in the Big Cypress Swamp behind Clyde’s Big Cypress Gallery. Joey was running the camera and I was taking pictures of our set-up. It was then that I stopped for a moment to think about it all. The last time I was here doing swamp walks was as a kid. Little did I know that as an adult I would be back filming with my Dad working on a documentary on Clyde Butcher. I thought it was a really cool way to start things off: Here we are, back at the place where my Dad first met Clyde over 25 years ago (before I was even a twinkle in his eye!), and we are creating a documentary on his life story.

A panoramic of Elam Stoltzfus delivering the intro to the Kickstarter short while Joey Dickinson films. Image by Nic Stoltzfus.
A panoramic of Elam Stoltzfus delivering the intro to the Kickstarter short while Joey Dickinson films. Image by Nic Stoltzfus.
Nic on a swamp walk with his dad, Elam.
Nic on a swamp walk with his dad, Elam.
Trying to get a photo of baby gators. Image by Elam Stoltzfus.
Trying to get a photo of baby gators. Image by Elam Stoltzfus.
A baby gator. Image by Nic Stoltzfus.
A baby gator. Image by Nic Stoltzfus.

After this, Joey and I filmed another swamp walk. When we finished cleaning up, our crew left for Everglades City for a late lunch. We stopped at Camellia Street Grill, found a table outside, and waited for our food to arrive. There was a slight breeze and not a cloud in the sky. It was nice to feel the sun on my face—February in north Florida is still cold and cloudy, and the warmth was a welcome precursor to spring. In a way, though, since south Florida is partly tropical, it is eternal spring. Some people like this. I like a bit of cold weather and cloudy days if only because it makes me appreciate sunshine and warmth even more. Plus, as my momma told me, “too much sunshine leaves you burned.”

Nic and Joey with their swamp walk crew.
Nic and Joey with their swamp walk crew.

Once we finished eating, we picked up a quart of ice cream for the swamp crew, and headed back to the gallery. I read a few more short stories from my Flannery O’Conner book before dark and then headed upstairs to meet up with the rest of the swamp crew. Later that evening, Joey got out his guitar and played for us while John, one of the muck-about guides and employee at Big Cypress National Preserve, played harmonica. It was a really good set and they meshed well together even thought they had only known each other for less than two days. The second song in, Joey sang a modified version of Bob Dylan’s ballad “Motorpsycho Nightmare”; he switched the main character to Clyde and changed the setting to Florida. It was amusing and elicited whistles and loud applause after the duo finished the song.

Later in the evening he played one of my favorite songs, “Laundry Room” by the Avett Brothers. I really like the refrain: “I am a breathing time machine.” Since the song is about the ephemerality of love, I thought those words to be quite poignant. Not only is the song beautifully written, but there are some complex chords in the piece and Joey has continued to practice it and has gotten quite good.

After he finished his set, we went to bed, all of us ready to head back to Blountstown the next day. Before I went to sleep, I lay in bed thinking about all the great things we did over the last few days. It was a great trip, and I couldn’t wait to look through all the photos and video from the last few days.

Joey and John playing up a storm. Image by Elam Stoltzfus.
Joey and John playing up a storm. Image by Elam Stoltzfus.

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