The Apalachicola Riverview Project, Part VI: The Aftermath

January 13th, 2014

By Nic Stoltzfus

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10-minute video by the crew at Live Oak Production Group featuring the Apalachicola Riverview Project

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The crew and support team. Left to right: Cynthia Trone, Justin Riney, Danny Veshinski, Kristian Gustavson, Joey Dickinson, Elam Stoltzfus, Nic Stoltzfus, John Ruskey, Paul Veselack, Esther Stoltzfus, and Mark “River” Peoples. (Photo: Laura Stoltzfus)

One week on the river and finally finished. The following morning after our expedition, the guys relaxed at my parents’ house in Blountstown. Dad and Kristian ran the river again from top to bottom. John and Paul drove the truck down to Apalachicola to meet the boat crew there and spent the day museum-hopping and bay-diving. In the meanwhile, I stayed at home and hung out with the guys left: Danny, River, Justin, and Joey. My sister came home from FSU Thursday night and so she joined us. On a quest to grab a local burger, the six of us headed to El Jalisco’s in Blountstown. We sat around for an hour or so and swapped stories and River shared with us more about what they do at Quapaw Canoe Company. The more I listened to him, the more impressed I was. Here is this company that is working with underprivileged youth along the Lower Mississippi river valley teaching them skills that they can use to get a job after high school. But, according to River, it is more than that. It is also teaching self-confidence, motivation, and discipline. These are the life skills that everyone needs in order to become better people, better humans. Joey listened all-ears. This talk excited him—he hoped to go out to visit the Quapaw Canoe Company next March over spring break to do a project with them. I could see that he believed in what they were doing, and he wanted to help spread the good news to others.

After our talk Laura and I took the guys around town for a tour: We showed them the old M&B (Marianna & Blountstown) steam engine located on Hwy 71 downtown, the landside view of Neal Landing, and the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. The settlement is a collection of old houses collected from around the panhandle; many of them are “cracker” houses or pioneer cabins. A Florida history buff, Justin was in his element and enjoyed looking through all of these. At one point the manager of the Pioneer Settlement, Willard Smith, showed up and introduced himself. Seeing that Justin had an interest in local history, he took him over to the blacksmith barn and showed him various tools used throughout the decades to form metalwork.

After this, we came back to our place and relaxed for a while. Early that evening we headed to my Aunt Mary Lou’s house to watch her milk her cows. The co-owner and operator of Ocheessee Creamery, she has around 100 Jersey cows she milks twice a day as part of a small-time dairy operation. One of the best tour guides I’ve ever seen, my aunt took the guys through a serious nuts and bolts tour covering the barn, the cows, and the Florida dairy industry. The guys asked thoughtful questions and thanked her several times for the “incredible” chocolate milk we got on the trip. Justin even got to milk a cow. Many pictures were taken and lots of cow puns were made, but I’m sure these jokes are in udderly poor taste for such a highbrow readership. Any more and it may be tit for tat. I guess we should mooo-ve on to the next paragraph.

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Mary Lou Wesselhoeft showing Justin and River the dairy (Photo: Nic Stoltzfus)

After the tour we met up with Dad, John, Kristian, and Paul who had just arrived back from driving the boat back from Apalachicola. We were all in for quite a treat this evening: Our neighbors the Duetts had offered to cook for us. And they made one of my most favorite meals on earth—southern-fried catfish with hushpuppies, cheese grits, and black-eyed peas. You wanna talk about winning over the heart of a southern man? Here’s your sign. There was lots of laughing, fun, and fellowship that evening.

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Sweet tea, fried catfish, hushpuppies, mashed taters, black-eyed peas, and cheese grits. Hongry? (Photo: The lucky guy who ate it) 

Saturday morning we woke up and headed back to Apalachicola for a reception hosted by the Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce and Mother Ocean (the organization that Expedition Florida 500 is housed under and founded by Justin Riney). One of the local politicians handed us a recognition of our efforts to bring attention to the river.

I chatted with one local woman who is interested in cartography (an interest of mine since a young age) and she talked about how important it is that we did what we did. She said that by taking so many pictures and by using such data-rich photo-capture as Kristian used with Below the Surface, we were creating a baseline. This baseline is important because it is data that can be used later down the line. For example, say that there is a drought year ten years from now, in 2023, and cities upstream would like to pull more water out of the river. With these pictures, it can be used as photographic evidence in making an argument not to pull out more water past a certain point based on historical levels—information we provided through photographs taken in 2013.

After the reception, the crew, friends, and family headed over to Hole in the Wall—a local seafood restaurant in Apalachicola. We tried all kinds of oysters harvested in the bay—raw, Rockefeller, garlic parmesan, and jalapeno cheddar. My favorite way to eat an oyster is resting on a saltine cracker with a dab of Crystal’s hot sauce. Simple and flavorful. I guess just don’t think too hard about what exactly it is you are eating—they are a filter for the river. Maybe that’s why dogs like drinking from the toilet? By the same logic, would they like oysters? A doggie delicacy, for sure!

After lunch, the guys loaded up. Joey headed back to south Florida to see his family for the holidays, Justin and Danny went with Cynthia Trone to south Florida to be with family, and the remaining four Kristian, John, Paul, and River loaded up in their rig to head back westward to Mississippi.

It was raining outside and the guys pulled away waving us goodbye as they left this town, this river, this region until next time. Before River left he looked me in the eyes and said, “Nic, there is no goodbye. There is only ‘I’ll see you next time.’” Let it be so.

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Barefoot on the banks (Photo: Elam Stoltzfus)

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View of the Apalachicola River Valley from Alum Bluffs (Photo: John Ruskey)

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On the banks of the Apalach (Photo: Nic Stoltzfus)

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Dead Lakes (Photo: Joey Dickinson)

Additional Resources

For the first time ever, Apalachicola River: An American Treasure film is available online for free. This documentary was made in 2006 by Elam Stoltzfus and Live Oak Production group and you can find more information here: http://www.apalachicolaamericantreasure.com/index.html

Click here to watch the film on Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/user15709098/review/83819639/abaab4b564

For more information about Below the Surface, the group that captured 360 degree pictures for the Riverview Project, click here: http://belowthesurface.org

For more information on Justin Riney and Expedition Florida 500 click here: http://www.motherocean.org/xf500.html

For more information on the Quapaw Canoe Company and perhaps snagging a tour of the lower half of the Mississippi click here: http://www.island63.com

If you are interested in kayaking the Apalachicola river, I recommend doing a thorough search through the Apalachicola Blueway website. Earl Murrogh, has made several trips down the river and maintains the site. Click here: http://apalachicolablueway.com

If you want to take a look at another group who has made a venture down the river, I would recommend looking at David Moynahan’s blog. His photos are stunning (I think he is one of Florida’s best nature photographers), and the story of his expedition traveling on a partially solar-powered barge called the “Yok-che” is engrossing. Check it out here: http://www.davidmoynahan.com/blog/2013/12/portrait-of-a-river-project—success

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